Other Writing

In addition to writing academic philosophy, I like to write for a lay audience, both on philosophy and other topics. I am always interested to hear from anyone that would like to commission writing from me.

Below are some recent pieces I’ve written. Years ago I also did a lot of reviews for a popular online music site.


For Prospect:

John D Caputo’s truth problems (January 2014)

This is a review of John D Caputo’s book Truth, the first in a series of accessible philosophy books for the general reader from Penguin.

What’s the point of political philosophy? (May 2013)

This is a review of David Miller’s book Justice for Earthlings, in which I express some skepticism about ‘realist’ and ‘contextualist’ approaches to political philosophy. It was picked up by the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Arts & Letters Daily, and was amongst Prospect’s top ten most read articles of 2013.

Arguing against gay marriage (January 2013)

This is not an argument against gay marriage, but rather a critical review of a book that argues against gay marriage: What Is Marriage? Man and Woman: A Defense by Sherif Girgis, Ryan T. Anderson & Robert P. George.

You can also find my reply to Girgis’ response here.

Against pragmatism (December 2012)

This is a critique of the invocation of pragmatism in political discourse. It was also picked up by thebrowser.com, a compendium of the web’s best writing.

Moral rethink (April 2012)

This piece concerns Jonathan Haidt’s book The Righteous Mind, and responds to an earlier review, also for Prospect, by David Goodhart, which had championed its message as the “last hope” for European liberalism.

Will the real liberal America please speak up? (July 2011)

This article urges American liberals to use the language of values more often and more effectively, and critiques the strategy of portions of America’s liberal left from from an outsider’s perspective.


For The Point:

Not for anything (in Issue 7, 2013)

This article – part of a symposium entitled ‘What is marriage for?’ – critiques teleologizing accounts of the essence or function of marriage.